It’s a New Year! Curriculum for 2018/2019

It’s that time of year! Even though we school over the summer, we do start our new year in September.

I’ve got four school years I am planning for this year – Year 6, Year 2 and Kindergarten  and Pre-K (Pre-K is mostly follow-along with Kindergarten).

We are heavily literature-based, so our curriculum is A LOT of good, quality books. Much of our reading is done as group read-alouds with an expectation of discussion and narration. A significant portion of our school day is spent reading together, rotating through reading selections for the three age groups. I look at Ambleside Online, Build Your Library, Beautiful Feet for reading selection and scheduling ideas.

We spend approximately an hour and a half per person (for Year 6 and Year 2) working on individual subjects – Math, Language Arts, Latin and some Science. This is a mixture of guided lessons and independent work that is done.

Year 6 (6th Grade, age 11/12)

Math

Singapore – we use the student textbook, workbook, intensive practice, as well as t he Home Instructor’s Guide (I definitely recommend this!)

Level 5B, Level 6A and Level 6B

Language Arts

Grammar for the Well-Trained Mind – Book 1 – I teach from the Core Instructor Text and Student Guide Key and student works from the Student (Purple) Workbook

Evan Moor – Reading Comprehension Fundamentals Grade 6

Evan Moor Building Spelling Skills Grade 6+

Vocabulary From Classical Roots – Level B

Science

* Chemistry is our focus this year. While our Year 2 will be participating in read alouds and demos, subject matter level is aimed at our Year 6 student.

DK The Way Science Works (spine text)

The Wonder Book of Chemistry  by Henri Fabri

The Mystery of the Periodic Table by Benjamin D. Wiker

Usborne’s Dictionary of Chemistry

Evan Moor Daily Science Grade 5 for supplemental reading and practice

History

* Renaissance/Early Modern and US (mid-1400s to early 1800s)

*We will be spreading the reading of our spine texts over the entire year. In addition, we have an extensive historical fiction read-aloud list that will be included

The Age of Empires

The Age of Voyages

The Age of Science and Revolutions

The World of Christopher Columbus and Sons by Genevieve Foster

The World of Captain John Smith by Genevieve Foster

George Washington’s World by Genevieve Foster

Abraham Lincoln’s World by Genvieve Foster

Historical Fiction read-alouds:

The Shakespeare Stealer by Gary Blackwood

Pippo the Fool by Tracey E. Fern

Midnight Magic by Avi

The Ghost of the Tokaido Inn by Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler

The Ravenmaster’s Secret: Escape from the Tower of London

The Matchlock Gun by Walter Edmonds

Poor Richard by James Daugherty

A Courage Undaunted by James Daugherty

Carry On, Mr. Bowditch by Jean Lee Statham

The Great Little Madison by Jean Fritz

Johnny Tremain by Esther Forbes

Out of Many Waters by Jacqueline Greene

Stowaway by Karen Hesse

Calico Bush by Rachel Field

The Sign of the Beaver by Elizabeth George Speare

Indian Captive: The Mary Jamison Story by Lois Lenski

Literature

Bulfinch’s Greek and Roman Mythology: The Age of Fable – started this past year, will be completing this year

Plutarch’s Lives – using the Ambleside Online Study Guides

Demosthenes

Cicero

Demetrius

Shakespeare -I use Folger Library editions. Books with annotations (links below) with printable versions for student (no annotations) through the Folger Library (tons of resources here so check it out!).

Julius Caesar

Richard III

Henry VIII

Geography

Carpenter’s North America Reader

DK Geography: A Visual Dictionary – select physical geography topics

Latin

Latin for Children Primer B

Bible/Theology

AWANA – continuing with AWANA program

The Shorter Westminster Catechism – typically we work to memorize one Question/Answer every week or so, and review what we have covered

Parables from Nature – we enjoy short faith based stories during our morning read aloud time.

Scriptures – following the Ambleside Online reading schedule, we will cover Genesis and Matthew over the course of the year

Nature Study

Experiencing Nature with Children – loosely following for seasonal suggestions

Handbook of Nature Study – an excellent parent/teacher resource

Cornell Lab of Ornithology – we will participate in Project Feederwatch again this year and use resources throughout the year, such as Bird Academy and eBird.

Critical Thinking

Building Critical Thinking Skills Level 2 – a great resource for verbal and figural critical thinking skills

Year 2 (2nd Grade, Age 7)

Math

Singapore – we use the student textbook, workbook, intensive practice, as well as the Home Instructor’s Guide

Level 1B, Level 2A, Level 2B

Language Arts

First Language Lessons Level 1

Evan Moor Building Spelling Skills Daily Practice Grade 2

Evan Moor Reading Comprehension Fundamentals Grade 2

Evan Moor Basic Phonics Skills Level C

History

Story of the World – Book 2 The Middle Ages – book and activity guide (for map work and suggested supplemental reading)

Science

Burgess Animal Book by Thorton Burgess

Kid’s Guide to Exploring Nature

Childcraft Annual (1995) – Our Amazing Bodies

Evan Moor Daily Science Grade 2

Geography

Tree in the Trail by Holling C. Holling

Seabird by Holling C. Holling

DK Geography: A Visual Dictionary – select physical geography topics

Latin

Song School Latin 1

Literature

Aesop’s Fables – completing this fall

Tales from Shakespeare (Lamb)

The Wind in the Willows (Graham)

Bible/Theology

AWANA – continuing with AWANA program

The Shorter Westminster Catechism – typically we work to memorize one Question/Answer every week or so, and review what we have covered

Parables from Nature – we enjoy short faith based stories during our morning read aloud time.

Scriptures – following the Ambleside Online reading schedule, we will cover Genesis and Matthew over the course of the year

Nature Study

Experiencing Nature with Children – loosely following for seasonal suggestions

Handbook of Nature Study – an excellent parent/teacher resource

Cornell Lab of Ornithology – we will participate in Project Feederwatch again this year and use resources throughout the year, such as Bird Academy and eBird.

Kindergarten (Year 0) – Age 5/6

Math

Family Math – games and hands-on activities

Spectrum Math Kindergarten

Starfall – online as well as printables

Language Arts

Evan Moor Phonics Level A

Spectrum Phonics Kindergarten

Starfall – online and printables

Literature

Five in a Row (FIAR) Volume 1 and 2 – literature selections and discussion prompts

Bible/Theology

AWANA – continuing with AWANA program

The Shorter Westminster Catechism – reading and review during morning reading time but no memorization expected at this age

Parables from Nature – we enjoy short faith based stories during our morning read aloud time.

Scriptures – following the Ambleside Online reading schedule, we will cover Genesis and Matthew over the course of the year

Critical Thinking

Building Critical Thinking Skills Beginnning Level – a great resource for verbal and figural critical thinking skills *I will say that this Beginner level has some content that is “too easy” for my Kindergartner. But I decided to start him at this level because the next level up has a lot of writing, and he is no where near ready for that yet.

*** Science and Nature Study are “tag -along” at this level

Pre-Kindergarten – Age 4

Math

Family Math – games and hands-on activities

Starfall – online as well as printables

Language Arts

Evan Moor Phonics Level A

Starfall – online and printables

Literature

Five in a Row (FIAR) Volume 1 and 2 – literature selections and discussion prompts

Bible/Theology

AWANA – continuing with AWANA program

The Shorter Westminster Catechism – reading and review during morning reading time but no memorization expected at this age

Parables from Nature – we enjoy short faith based stories during our morning read aloud time.

Scriptures – following the Ambleside Online reading schedule, we will cover Genesis and Matthew over the course of the year

*** Science and Nature Study are “tag-along” at this point

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

It seems like a lot once it’s all on paper, but it really is mostly a ton of good books! My oldest LOVES workbooks, so I tend to load her up at her request, and I use multiple resources spread across the week for them all – it helps break up tasks too – I can do “table” work with some while others are doing independent reading. It works for us.

Note – I’ve loved Evan Moor workbooks for years, and usually bought the teacher’s guide and photocopied them as needed. This year I have started buying the e-books directly from Evan Moor and it is a life saver! Printing from my computer instead of photocoping is definitely the way to go!

 

In Common: February 2nd 2018

In Common is my (mostly) weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the week, and current reading list.

I have not kept up with my commonplace over the winter months, but I am trying to get back into good habits. I’ve managed to keep up with my reading schedule since the new year, and so I am pretty motivated to start my weekly summaries as well.

One of my longer term reads I started in January is the Introduction to The Gateway to the Great Books. This short offering is similar to the Introduction to The Great Books of the Western World (which is awesome, by the way), introducing readers to the value of reading good books. One thing that is mentioned is the different kinds of reading matter, and how different books call for different styles of reading. Not everything needs to be read actively, but in the same vein not all books are worth reading at all.

“We need to remind ourselves of this bygone situation in which a book was a lifelong treasure, to be read again and again. Deluged as we are with a welter of printed words, we tend to devaluate all writing, to look at every book on the shelf as the counterpart of every other, and to weigh volumes instead of words. The proliferation of printing, on the one hand a blessing, has had, on the other, a tendency to debase (or, in any case, homogenize) our attitude toward reading.” (GTTGB, Introduction p.19)

As for the importance of actively reading a book (and Mortimer Adler was all about actively reading, pencil in hand to mark up the book):

“Buying a book is only a prelude to owning it. To own a book involves more than paying for it and putting it on the shelf in one’s home. Full ownership comes only to those who have made the books they have bought part of themselves – by absorbing and digesting them. The well-marked pages of a much handled volume constitutes one of the surest indications that this has taken place. Too many persons make the mistake of substituting economic possession or physical proprietorship for intellectual ownership.” (GTTGB, Introduction p. 29)

I’ve got so many good books going on right now, including our read alouds (for school as well as bedtime)! I’ll share some more excerpts next week.

Current (Personal) Reads:

Current Read Alouds:

Reading lists, planning and accountability

I spent my New Year’s Day with my personal scholar planner, my 2017 book list, paper and pencils.

My monthly spread in my personal scholar journal helps me keep track of Good Morning Girls daily bible chapter readings, as well as any live author events through Read Aloud Revival or with a book club.

I finished my 2017 book list, but needed to sit down and work out the nuts and bolts. How am I going to get all those books read in a year?!

 

 

 

 

I first prepared a divided a unlined sheet of paper into 12 blocks – one block for each month.

I decided to plan a quarter at a time since it’s possible I won’t make all my goals and this allows me to retool my plans before each quarter.

My books generally fall into one of two categories – long-term (over the course of the year, or several months at least) and monthly reads.

At the top of each block, I listed all my long-term books. Below these I then listed books I expect to be able to read in a month.

In my previous post, I mentioned several areas I am focusing on this year. When planning my monthly goals, I tried to include one book from Educational Philosophy, Parenting and Christian Study. I also selected two or three fiction titles and one from another area.

On paper, then I might have fifteen books listed. This sounds daunting to me, but eight are long-term reads, so I am reading just a little at a time. For example, each month I will read the corresponding chapter in The Life-giving Home, and in In Defense of Sanity, I am reading one essay a week.

My weekly bullet journal spread. I plan out daily reading portions for my current reads. I purposely leave the weekend light since I know I won’t get much reading done. I also plan the upcoming week on the weekend.

On my weekly planning pages, I list out all the books I plan to read each day, and make not of chapters or pages to work through. I only do this on a weekly basis, in case I haven’t met any of my weekly goals. Having a checklist helps me feel accomplished as I work through my daily reading goals.

 

For those books I am planning to finish in the month, I have planned for more intensive reading periods.

So… why even do this? I am not a formal student anymore. I don’t have quizzes or exams, I’m not paying for courses or risking a poor grade if I don’t get my reading done. So why the planning, why the schedule, why the extra effort?

Last year, I planned out my 2016 book list, and when I fell behind in my reading schedule, I stressed.

But I persisted and even though I fell short of my reading goal, I still read A LOT more books than I would have if I had not bothered to research and put together a reading plan, plan a reading schedule and commit to regular personal study time.

I list out my goals for the month, including books I want to complete, and how much progress I’d like to make in others. I also prepare a tracker page with day columns. Each book gets a row, and I fill in a block for each day that I read from that book.

I am active in an online book community and there is an awesome comradery and environment of encouragement and even a mild sense accountability.

 

 

 

Though honestly, there still isn’t a consequence for falling short of the goal like there would be in school.

So again, why I am doing all this?

December’s Reading Tracker page. Each day I read a particular book, I fill in a block. Lines indicate that a book was completed.

I love the term ‘personal scholarship.’ It really sums up what I am striving for, and what is the driving force for everything I do.

There are so many things I want to read about and learn and experience through books, and no one is going to hold me accountable except for me, because it is a personal goal.

By planning and scheduling, I am making a commitment, a contract with myself to work toward a goal. I want to hold myself accountable to this commitment.

If I fall short, well I reevaluate my reading goal and adjust my plans and schedules – maybe it is not realistic in light of family commitments. I reevaluate and adjust, I do not abandon. I keep the contract as a tangible “thing” that I am making myself accountable to.