In Common – March 16th Edition

I love when I get to start a new stack of books at the beginning of the month. I still have a couple of longer-term reads I’m finishing up this month – Don Quixote and The Genius of Birds. But I’ve got several new titles on my Current Reads shelf.

I tend to get bogged down in heavier reads – I struggled with this at the end of last year, and my reading goals suffered as a result. Last year my reading list was heavy on educational philosophy, and currently I have found myself in a season of reading about parenting, with an emphasis on special needs and issues. I want to make sure I leave enough room in my schedule for lighter reads – I’ve actually been spending more time of science fiction and fantasy, and it’s only in the last week or so that I only have a single title – Starship Troopers (I’m listening on Audible) – as a current sci-fi read.

This month I am FINALLY going to finish Don Quixote! I think the sheer volume is intimidating – I’d read and read and then with so much further to go, I would need to set it down for a time and read something else. But I have really enjoyed it -it is such a fun read!

Some of my newer titles this month:

Liturgy of the Ordinary by Tish Harrison Warren: The author relates the ordinary events of a typical day to church liturgy and to overall aspects of the Christian faith. As an Anglican priest, the Anglican church liturgy is her point of reference, but the message she brings is non-denominational. Each day I have read a chapter (I’m finishing this week and will put together a more thorough review) and while I have been tempted to tackle more than one chapter at a time, I have resisted the urged so I have time to really “chew” on the content throughout the day.

A Parent’s Guide to High-Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder by Sally Ozonoff, Geraldine Dawson, and James McPartland: This book is an excellent guide for parents who suspect they may be dealing with a child with high-functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder, parents who have recently received a diagnosis, and for families who have been living with autism for a while. It starts out with a detailed explanation of what high functioning ASD is, how it is defined according to the DSM (the newest edition as well as the more familiar previous edition), the diagnosis process, and challenges that children and young adults may face. This book is very detailed but without being unreadable to the average parent. I’m finishing this up this week and will put together a more detailed review.

All the Single Ladies by Rebecca Traister: Listed in The New York Times Book Review 100 Notable Books for 2016, this book tackles the history of unmarried women in this country, examining various aspects of singlehood such as the political and social power of women in history, independence in an urban setting, single women and friendships, as well having children.

In the past couple of weeks I’ve also completed reading Altered Carbon by Richard K. Morgan. It was really good, and I am ready to binge watch the Netflix series and continue reading the next book (of three) in the Takeshi Kovacs series.

Current Personal Reads

Current Family Read-Alouds

In Common: February 2nd 2018

In Common is my (mostly) weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the week, and current reading list.

I have not kept up with my commonplace over the winter months, but I am trying to get back into good habits. I’ve managed to keep up with my reading schedule since the new year, and so I am pretty motivated to start my weekly summaries as well.

One of my longer term reads I started in January is the Introduction to The Gateway to the Great Books. This short offering is similar to the Introduction to The Great Books of the Western World (which is awesome, by the way), introducing readers to the value of reading good books. One thing that is mentioned is the different kinds of reading matter, and how different books call for different styles of reading. Not everything needs to be read actively, but in the same vein not all books are worth reading at all.

“We need to remind ourselves of this bygone situation in which a book was a lifelong treasure, to be read again and again. Deluged as we are with a welter of printed words, we tend to devaluate all writing, to look at every book on the shelf as the counterpart of every other, and to weigh volumes instead of words. The proliferation of printing, on the one hand a blessing, has had, on the other, a tendency to debase (or, in any case, homogenize) our attitude toward reading.” (GTTGB, Introduction p.19)

As for the importance of actively reading a book (and Mortimer Adler was all about actively reading, pencil in hand to mark up the book):

“Buying a book is only a prelude to owning it. To own a book involves more than paying for it and putting it on the shelf in one’s home. Full ownership comes only to those who have made the books they have bought part of themselves – by absorbing and digesting them. The well-marked pages of a much handled volume constitutes one of the surest indications that this has taken place. Too many persons make the mistake of substituting economic possession or physical proprietorship for intellectual ownership.” (GTTGB, Introduction p. 29)

I’ve got so many good books going on right now, including our read alouds (for school as well as bedtime)! I’ll share some more excerpts next week.

Current (Personal) Reads:

Current Read Alouds:

In Common – November 1st Edition

In Common is my (mostly) weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the previous week, and current reading list.

My reading slump continues. I don’t know if it is because school is in full swing, the seasons are changing, or if I just overloaded my reading pile.

To be honest, I’ve put several books in my stack on the back burner and have focused on just one or two, while I have gotten caught up with the C.J. Cherryh Foreigner series. I’ve got the final two books arriving tomorrow (actually there is one more, but I make it a rule to wait until the paperback comes out for most of my fiction books, and the newest book comes out in paperback in January…).

I think the break has been helpful and I am trying to finish up my current stack for 2017. I might get a couple smaller titles squeezed in before year’s end, but I don’t expect to tackle any more from my 2017 list – they’ll just have to wait for 2018.

This week I am wrapping up Susan Wise Bauer’s The Well-educated Mind. Along the same lines as Adler’s How to Read a Book, Bauer’s book goes through different genre’s and the different approaches to actively read each. At the end of each chapter, she includes an extensive annotated book list, which includes recommendations for best editions to choose. I have really enjoyed this book, and my TBR list has become, to be honest, unwieldy at this point. Now that I am finishing up the book, I may go back, and focus on one genre’s annotated book list at a time.

This week, I started a new book (I know, I know…). I’m reading The Life-giving Table by Sally Clarkson. I have loved her other books, and I am so excited to get into her new book.

“Through our careful preparations, our attention to tone and atmosphere, our gifts of loving touch, our example of humble service, and the provision of satisfying food, we can bring ourselves and those we love closer to Christ and foster growth of body, mind, and spirit. ” The Life-giving Table, Sally Clarkson

This is an excellent follow-up to The Life-giving Home, where she focused on traditions and family functions. Her new offering covers feasts and meals as a way to minister to family, friends and community. Hospitality is an area I want to improve upon in 2018 (being an introvert is hard!), and Clarkson is an excellent mentor for this.

 

Current Reads:

In Common – September 20th Edition

In Common is my (mostly) weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the previous week, and current reading list.

My current read pile has grown a little stagnant. I’ve been busy getting ready for the new school year, and have not made nearly as much progress as I would have liked.

I’ve got a stack of books to preread for my Year 5 student as well, so I am pretty sure many of the remaining titles on my 2017 list will be pushed to 2018. But I have managed to wrap a couple books up.

I recently finished In Defense of Sanity. This is an extensive collection of essays written by G.K. Chesterton and I believe it is a wonderful introduction to Chesterton’s writings.I’m already giving thought to what is next for me, as far as Chesterton goes. I’ve got the complete Father Brown Mysteries, which I just have never found the time to start, but maybe something a little deeper, like The Everlasting Man. One of my favorite quotes from In Defense of Sanity is taken from “If I Only Had One Sermon to Preach.”

“Pride is a poison so very poisonous that it not only poisons the virtues; it even poisons the other vices.”  In Defense of Sanity

I took a break from my current stack and read A Man Called Ove this past week. This was such a wonderful book, and it provided a much-needed break from all the non-fiction I’ve been working on. Ove is such a man of principle, and while he is a surly man of few words, and seemingly averse to forming friendships, somehow he manages to touch the lives of so many people. Even as a young man, he lived by a simple code, passed down from his father.

“‘Men are what they are because of what they do. Not what they say’, said Ove.” A Man Called Ove

This week I am trying to finally finish Locke’s Second Treatise. I have enjoyed reading it, though I have been at odds with some of Locke’s arguments (mostly his argument that labor puts the greatest part of value on land, a view that can be seen in the justification of wholesale Native American land grabbing) but overall his writing on the rights of man, man’s role in society and the limit of authority and government is fascinating.

I did take a break from my regular reading schedule to binge read a couple books from C.J. Cherryh’s Foreigner series. I am a couple of trilogies behind schedule and trying to get caught up.

And as is my habit, I did start another book this weekend – Kay Arthur’s How to Study Your Bible. This is an excellent overview of inductive bible study methods. I am a little familiar with the method because of my time spent doing Good Morning Girls bible study, which uses an inductive approach (somewhat), and also because my daughter has worked through Kay Arthur’s How to Study Your Bible For Kids. I expect it to be a quick but impactive read.

 

Current Reads:

In Common – June 14th Edition

In Common is my weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the previous week, and current reading list.

I continue to progress slowly through my June stack. I’ve fallen behind in my Don Quixote reading – I had hoped to be further along but I think I overloaded myself this month. But small steps are better than nothing.

I am really enjoying Don Quixote. It is such a funny story, and I so love the dialogue. I was laughing out loud throughout Chapter XII, where Pedro the goatherd is telling the story of the broken hearted shepherd Grisostomo to Don Quixote. Pedro keeps using the wrong words and Don Quixote corrects him several times, to the point of annoyance, but always followed with a gracious compliment of the man’s storytelling skills. After the story is finished, Don Quixote, having been invited to attend the funeral of the deceased shepherd, responds:

“I shall be certain to, ” said Don Quixote, “and I thank you for the pleasure you have given me with the narration of so delightful a story.” (Don Quixote)

I am currently reading about autobiographies in The Well-educated Mind. This has never been a genre that has caught my attention, but this particular chapter is really winning me over.

“You no longer read an autobiography to find out the truth about past events (an assumption that governed the memoirs of political retirees for decades). Rather, you read autobiography to find out what it’s like to see the world from another point of view, from inside the skin of another person.” (The Well-educated Mind)

Susan Wise Bauer suggests the book The Timetables of History as a reference tool. I’m ordering it this week and look forward to utilizing this resource. Amazon allows you to peek inside, so you can see how the tables are set up, with time periods along the left side and columns containing significant events in several categories including history and politics, literature and theatre, music, religion, philosophy and learning.

I continue to enjoy Educating the Whole-hearted Child. So many gems in this book! Concerning reading and language arts:

“the single best way to strengthen your children’s minds is making sure they read lots of good books.” (Educating the Whole-hearted Child)

And this comment about raising readers:

“Do everything you can to cultivate in your children a love of books. Give them their own copies of special books they read on their own, illustrated storybooks that capture their hearts, series of books that they especially enjoy, classics that every child should have, informational books about subjects that are special to them, and even books that they are not quite ready for but will be soon.” (Educating the Whole-hearted Child)

And finally:

“Be generous with books. It is an investment that will return hundredfold rewards in your children’s lives.” (Educating the Whole-hearted Child)

I’m pretty sure that Clay and Sally just told me to go buy a lot more books. Done and done!

Current Reads:

 

In Common: May 10th Edition

In Common is my weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the previous week, and current reading list.

This has been a hectic week at home, and so I haven’t made as much progress, page wise, as I had planned for my weekly schedule. But I did manage to make significant progress in my fiction read, Waking Gods, and got off to a good start with A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe.

This week I worked through the Introduction in A Beginner’s Guide, and it was pretty awesome.

This is also not just a book for reading, but for doing. I have ordered a geometry set to use as I work through the book (and my kid’s aren’t allowed to touch it!). I know we have compasses and set squares for use in our math lessons, but I want a set all my own, for my own scholarship.

“Both Pythagoras and Plato suggested that all citizens learn the properties of the first ten numbers as a form of moral instruction.” A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe

I am finding this book goes along well with my other read, The Fourth Turning, which examines recurring cycles that occur in human history.

“When the lessons of symbolic or philosophical mathematics seen in nature, which were designed intro religious architecture or art, are applied functionally (not just intellectually) to facilitate the growth and transformation of consciousness, then mathematics may rightly be called “sacred.” A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe

 Most of my May reads are my “slow and steady” titles, but I have The Beginner’s Guide, as well as a couple of fiction reads I hope to get to this month.

Current Reads:

 

In Common: May 3rd Edition

In Common is my weekly Commonplace roundup – notable quotes from the previous week, and current reading list.

I spent the final week of April trying to wrap up a few titles and make room in my stack for May reads. This past week I finished Experiencing God, Honey for a Child’s Heart, and 10 Habits of Happy Moms. I also read Henry and the Chalk Dragon to my children.

Experiencing God has been quite impactful – I’ve been working through it slowly since January and I strongly recommend it to Christians. No matter how far along your Christian walk you may be, you will be challenged in your relationship with God and come out with a deeper understanding of what it really means to experience God in your personal life, and as part of the larger Christian body.

“You can’t stay where you are and go with God at the same time.” Henry Blackaby, Experiencing God

I feel like I am late to the game, having only just now read Honey for a Child’s Heart, though I have been homeschooling since 2011, and have four children at home. This book is so full of goodness – and I am so thankful that our family leans so heavily on good literature, not just for homeschooling but for character building and family entertainment. This is a resource I will return to again and again as my children grow.

“Children’s books cannot be written for or down to children. Children reject books that do not treat them as equal.” Gladys Hunt, Honey for a Child’s Heart

The 10 Habits for Happy Moms is a great resource for moms who struggle to consider their own needs because they are constantly meeting the needs of others. Meg Meeker does a great job reminding women that self care is so important, and she addresses ten habits to cultivate to improve happiness.

“We all choose what thoughts will fill the spaces in our minds, if you will, at the beginning of the day. It is a simple mathematical truth that if we spend more time pondering what we don’t have, we will have far less time to feel grateful for what we do have.” Meg Meeker, The 10 Habits of Happy Mothers

I’ll mention Henry and the Chalk Dragon even though it is a family read, and not just in my personal stack. This is a must read for families. We had so much fun reading this book aloud. It is laugh out loud funny and so sweet!

“Don’t insult anything that has just shimmied down the drain.” Jennifer Trafton, Henry and the Chalk Dragon

I started a new book in April that I’ll work on over the spring and summer. The Well-Educated Mind by Susan Wise Bauer. Part ‘How to Read a Book’ and part great books reading list, I am enjoying this so far.

I am reading A Beginner’s Guide to Constructing the Universe this month with several others. I’ve only just started so I’ll share more as I get into it.

Current Reads:

In Common: Surprised By Joy

My 2016 reading plan has gone off the rails, thanks  to  my return to work. Even with working part-time, I am struggling to keep up with my self-imposed pace.

But that’s okay. My reading list should work for me, and not the other way around. I have been reevaluating my list, and have been deciding which titles are must-haves for the year, and which ones can be postponed.

My current Read pile includes a couple of titles I’ve been working on slowly since January, as well as a few new ones that I’ve just added.

During this season of life, I am finding myself drawn to books that focus on educational philosophy, parenting, and Christian faith.

One book that I am wrapping up this week (finally!) is C.S. Lewis Surprised By  Joy.

While I have been exploring the writings of C.S. Lewis, it has been incredible to read about his childhood and early life experiences. So often, we have a one-dimensional view of authors; we only know them through their writings.

C.S. Lewis is of course known for his writings on Christian apologetics, but to read about his transformation into an atheist and eventual discovery of true Christian faith is quite moving.

Lewis shared about his time living with and being tutored by a family friend Mr. Kirkpatrick, or Old Knock as he was sometimes called. He wrote of his time reading and studying Homer in Greek.

In our homeschool, we are just getting started with Latin, which I am quite excited about since I studied Latin all through high school.  We have also learned the Hebrew alphabet and are still in the early stages of learning vocabulary and basic grammar.

This passage, from Lewis’ time with Old Knock, really struck me as we work on learning new languages.

The great gain was that I very soon became able to understand a great deal without (even mentally) translating it; I was beginning to think in Greek. That is the great Rubicon to cross in learning any language. Those in whom the Greek word lives only while they are hunting for it in the lexicon, and who then substitute the English word for it, are not reading the Greek at all; they are only solving a puzzle. The very formula, “Naus means a ship,” is wrong. Naus and ship both mean a thing, they do not mean one another. Behind Naus, as behind navis or naca, we want to have a picture of a dark, slender mass with sail or oars, climbing the ridges, with no officious English word intruding.

As I find myself getting stressed out because I have less time available for personal scholarship right now, I am reminded of another passage, again from Lewis’ time with Old Knock. Reflecting on the ideal day of study and reflection, what he terms “settled, calm, Epicurean life.” This ideal schedule, defined by set study times and minimal interactions and distractions, sound wonderful to someone seeking a scholarly life. But as Lewis points out:

It is no doubt for my own good that I have been so generally prevented from leading it, for it is a life almost entirely selfish. Selfish, not self-centered: for in such a life my mind would be directed toward a thousand things, not one of which is myself.

These words will serve as a comfort as I try to find that perfect balance between family, faith, work and personal scholarship.