Writing in Books

I am currently reading Turn the Page: Read Right to Lead Right. This is a quick read, and contains some excellent suggestions on getting more out of your reading experience.

One of the thing leadership education promotes is writing in your books. This helps to move you from passive reading to active reading, because by taking notes, commenting in the margins, even making simple notes like “Wow!” or “!” you are interacting with the book. There are wonderful suggestions for what you could be writing in the books you read:

  • significant passages underlined or highlighted
  • references to other relevant books
  • arguments against the author’s point
  • paraphrases
  • an outline of the book (in the back of the book)
  • new vocabulary

I admit struggling with the idea of writing in my books. Throughout college and graduate school, I would highlight but was very specific in the color and type of highlighters that I would use, and then I was only marking up textbooks. Taking this particular suggestion to heart is pushing me out of my comfort zone a little but I do see the value in marking up books as you read them. For valued books in your personal library that will be revisited time and again, you will be able to see the impact the author had on you during previous reads.

For some self encouragement in enacting this, I set up a pencil box with RSVP pens in a multitude of colors, sharpened pencils, a full set of highlighters, and various sizes of post-it notes. Now when I sit down for my personal reading time, I pull out my books and my pencil box, prepared to actively read and annotate.

For books that aren’t mine (borrowed from friends or library) I take notes on post-its. I can then either transcribe my notes into Evernote or snap pictures of the post-it notes directly into Evernote.

For reading ebooks, annotations can be made in a separate journal (I have composition notebooks for reading journals) but the Kindle app does allow for notes and highlights to be added to the book. This is really simple. In the text, you simply tap and hold down your finger on the part of the text you wish to highlight or annotate. A small menu box appears with various highlighter colors to select. You can drag the corner of the highlighter box on the text to include however much text you wish to highlight. You also have the option to copy the text which can be pasted elsewhere. You can also directly record notes, which then can be accessed either by directly tapping on the icon that remains in the text or by pulling up “My Notebook” at the top of the screen (this page includes notes and bookmarks). I also discovered something new today – you can log into your Amazon kindle site. From here you can see all of your notes and highlights in your Kindle books. It is easy enough to use Evernote Web Clipper to clip a snapshot of the notes and highlights page. Disclaimer: As far as I can tell, PDFs you are reading in your Kindle app will not show up on the Kindle amazon site, so any notes you record in those documents will not show up.

I can already notice a difference in the depth of my reading now that I am making an effort to annotate what I am reading. This is definitely one technique I recommend to enhance your reading!

The Black Thing

Nothing is hopeless; we must hope for everything. Euripedes

Reassuring words from Mrs. Who, who speaks in quotes.

I find myself going back to this part, over and over. Mrs. Whatsit is explaining that Charles Wallace knows and understands how serious things are, what is at stake – far more than just the life of his and Meg’s father. But Mrs. Who, who speaks primarily in quotes because it is easier than finding her own words, reassures the group by quoting Euripedes.

Nothing is hopeless; we must hope for everything.

Nothing is hopeless. While we still breathe, and strive for things, nothing is hopeless. But far from just hoping things work out, or that we manage to survive, or the bare minimum happens, we should ‘hope for everything.’

Hopelessness is like the Black Thing, so dark that it blocks out even the stars. How can we function when we cannot even see? Hopelessness is paralyzing.

Our hoping, our striving, is what can make the difference. If we hope for everything, we have optimism and a sense of purpose and are aiming high. It’s this hope that pushes us forward, pushes us through the hard stuff.

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I am reading A Wrinkle in Time for the first time in decades. When I was young and reading it for the first time, I was reading it to just “read the story.” Now, however, I read books looking for lessons, regardless of whether the author intended a particular message to be gleaned.

Exodus 30

Exodus 30:15

The rich are not to give more than half a shekel and the poor are not to give less when you make the offering to the Lord to atone for your lives.

The atonement offering expected from all Israelites was half a shekel and was to be the same for both rich and poor.

Rich and poor have no bearing on the value of a man to God. One is not more worth (or less) of atonement. God counts us all equally worthy. We should be mindful of that even today.

I am thankful that God sees us equally and does not judge our value the same way we judge ourselves and others.

Exodus 27

Exodus 27:8

8 It is to be made just as you were shown on the mountain.

This is not the first time “just as you were shown on the mountain” is used in describing the Tabernacle plans. I don’t think Moses stood on the mountain and took down notes on the design of the Tabernacle, just hearing the voice of God. I picture God showing Moses a clear vision of the Tabernacle, so that Moses could fully visualize and experience the Tabernacle that God had planned. Only then could he return to the people with a clear image of it in his mind. I imagine him overseeing the work of the embroiderers, saying “No, No, it needs to be ‘just so.”

God can give us a clear vision of what he has in store for us. He can let us see it clearly, visualize it, experience it so that we know to plan, down to the ’embroidery’ details.

My prayer is that God gives me a Tabernacle vision too, so that I have a clear image of what he wants for me and what he has in store for me.

Exodus 23

Exodus 23:4-5

4 If you come across your enemy’s ox or donkey wandering off, be sure to take it back to him. 5 If you see the donkey of someone who hates you fallen down under its load, do not leave it there; be sure you help him with it.

We are called to help our enemies in a proactive way. If there was someone who despised me, and I happened to witness their ox or donkey wander off (or some modern equivalent of troubles), I could easily do nothing. It’s not like I let them escape or personally caused this trouble to happen. I am under no obligation to help them with their troubles. I could rest easy knowing that I didn’t do anything wrong by not assisting since it had nothing to do with me.But God calls us to do something, even for people who are our enemy.

We are to be proactive in helping them. While it would be simple enough to just “not do anything” if their ox or donkey wandered off, we are called to bring their animal back to them. If we see their donkey fall down under its load, we could easily just keep on walking since it’s not our fault, but instead God calls us to stop and help our enemy with it.

This is difficult!

In reading Russ Reznik’s essay Messianic Jewish Ethics in Introduction to Messianic Judaism, he writes “the divine image is obviously not a physical resemblance, but neither is it an abstract spiritual resemblance. Rather, it entails representing God through active engagement with the creation.

This understanding of the image of God gives rise to the Jewish idea that God does ethics before we do, that our ethical behavior is not just a matter of obedience, or even of pleasing God, but of reflecting God and his nature, fulfilling the assignment to bear the divine image.”

It’s hard to imagine what life would be like if God treated us like we treated our enemies. Even when we despise God, God loves us and blesses us. We are called to proactively bless our enemy, not just passively “not” harm them. We aren’t called to do this so much for obedience, but rather as a reflection of the divine image of God. God does ethics first.

Introduction to Messianic Judaism

I am slowly working through a collection of essays, edited by David Rudolph and Joel Willitts, entitled Introduction to Messianic Judaism. This is an excellent read, especially in light of the growth of the Messianic Jewish community and the interest of “gentiles” in the Hebrew roots of the Christian faith.

This book covers a lot of material: Messianic Jews in antiquity and the modern era, the “nuts and bolts” so to speak of Messianic worship style, synagogues, ethics, role of and relationship with women, and the relationship of Messianic Judaism and Israel. The relationship of Messianic Jews and the wider Jewish community, as well as with the Christian church, is also discussed.

There is a lot to chew in this book. I keep my Bible within reach, as well as my computer for clarification of unfamiliar concepts or words. Each chapter has suggestions for additional reading. and I find myself following rabbit trails as I read.

I’ve made it through the first half of the book, and rather than go through all the previous chapters, I am going to look through some of my notes and post some of the more significant points that I wrote down. As I work through the second half, I’ll continue to post quotes and thoughts on the current reading.

Walking on Water

I’m a member of a wonderful reading group online, and being a member has really challenged me to increase my personal reading and personal scholarship. For the month of February I am reading Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art, by Madeleine L’Engle.

Having only ever read her works of fiction, this book selection is revelatory. This book delves into the relationship between art and the act of creating, and our faith in the Creator.

As I read, I find myself nodding along and writing down select lines. I will share them, along with any other thoughts as I progress through the book. I’d love to hear feedback if you are also reading, or have read, this book.

Bible Study with Good Morning Girls

I have been reading the Bible following the Good Morning Girls schedule for a couple of months, and it’s been a real blessing. It is one chapter a day, with the intention of really getting into the scripture one small piece at a time. Courtney at Women Living Well promotes the SOAK method. The SOAK method is simple:

Scripture – Focus on one or a couple verses from that day’s chapter. Even in a chapter as “mundane” as one detailing the measurements of the Tabernacle’s curtains or listing off the geneology of one of the tribes of Israel, we can find a gem, a nugget of wisdom from God.

Observation – What is the selected verse talking about; what are our observations?

Application – This one is a little harder. How does what we observe in the selected verse(s) apply to our life today? How can we use this scripture to grow in our spiritual life?

Kneel in Prayer – Previously P for Prayer in the SOAP method. How are we moved to pray following our bible study?

The new year started with the reading of Exodus, and will be wrapping up this month. I’ll be sharing some of my SOAK notes for the remainder of Exodus, and then move into Matthew in March.